The Library

Welcome to the Empathy Library search page. Use keywords to search for books and films, or browse the collection using filters (e.g. under Book Type select 'fiction' or under Theme choose 'love' or 'poverty'). Results are automatically ranked by popularity. Join the library to add items, comment and give ratings.

Displaying library items 1 - 10 of 19
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Ben Kingsley dons his dhoti (loincloth) in Richard Attenborough’s epic biopic about one of the greatest empathy masters about them all. The film is full of great empathic moments.

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Average: 5 (2 votes)

George Orwell is best known for his fictional works Animal Farm and 1984. But when it comes to his greatest empathic writing, Down and Out in Paris and London ranks as outstanding.

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Average: 5 (1 vote)

George Eliot (Mary Anne Evans) was a great believer in the power of empathy to move her readers. Back when she was writing in the 19th century, empathy was generally known as ‘sympathy’.

film
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Average: 5 (1 vote)
Think you know homelessness? Think again...  
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One of the great American realist novels and a top empathy book.  Set during the Great Depression, the novel focuses on the Joads, a poor family of tenant farmers driven from their

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John Hurt stars as John Merrick, the hideously deformed 19th century Londoner known as "The Elephant Man". Treated as a sideshow freak, Merrick is assumed to be retarded as well as misshapen because of his inability to speak coherently.

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This is a great empathy book because it's about how a woman from a wealthy white family in Memphis, Tennessee takes a troubled black teenager under her wing and gives him the opportunity to get an education and play (American) football at high school.

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Twenty Thousand Streets Under the Sky is the ultimate novel about pubs- the places where many of us spend our twenties, watching people come and go.

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Truth and Beauty is lifted above most memoirs by Ann Patchett’s unselfishness; she is writing a book that tells her own story, but frequently steps aside to offer the full spotlight to her friend, the magical, difficult Lucy Grealy, author of ‘Autobiography of a Face.’ Lucy Grealy, who died at th

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